Brian takes the wheel this week and sits down with Graham Allison, the founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and a leading military strategist. For decades, Allison has advised defense secretaries and presidents on both sides of the political aisle. Now he’s out with a new book that examines whether America and China are destined to go to war. He and Brian delve into the challenges associated with China’s rising power, the diplomatic implications of the Paris Climate Accord, and why the U.S. seems caught in a slow-motion Cuban Missile Crisis with North Korea.

When Sheila Nevins started her career in the 1960s, she didn’t know women could be bosses. After all, she’d only ever worked for male supervisors. Now, at 78, she’s the president of HBO Documentary Films. Sheila joins us for an unflinching conversation about everything from her painful childhood memories to her plastic surgery. Plus, we discuss what makes a great documentary and listen to celebrities read excerpts from Sheila’s new book.

Christie Todd Whitman was New Jersey’s first female governor, but she didn’t grow up thinking that she’d like to run for office. She joins us to discuss her path to public service, why she left as George W. Bush’s EPA Administrator, and shared her assessment of New Jersey’s current Governor Christie. Plus, she talks about the state of her party, and the country, under President Donald Trump.

 

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has scored the most points of any NBA player in history, and basketball isn’t the only arena where he’s found success. At 70, he’s a best-selling author, an award-winning cancer research advocate, and a prolific cultural commentator who isn’t afraid to speak out on controversial political and social issues. Kareem joined me on the podcast to talk about being black and Muslim in America, surviving cancer, and watching the game of basketball change since his own heyday. Plus, he explains what was so special about his friend and mentor John Wooden, the legendary UCLA basketball coach who is the subject of his latest book.

 

After more than 40 years working in America’s top newsrooms, Marty Baron is one of the most respected names in news. As editor of the Washington Post since 2012, he has led his staff to Pulitzers and helped them weather the changes that came when a tech billionaire bought the paper. Marty talks with us about the state of journalism, fake news, and how technology has changed his job. We’re also joined by Jessica Lessin, the founder and editor-in-chief of The Information, an innovative news site covering Silicon Valley.

 

After her husband died suddenly from a cardiac arrhythmia, Facebook’s COO Sheryl Sandberg (Lean In) thought she would never experience true joy again. Nearly two years later, she is out with a new book, Option B, that delves into how she proved herself wrong— and how others can build resilience in the face of trauma, too. Sandberg wrote Option B with her friend Adam Grant, an organizational psychologist and Wharton professor. They both joined me onstage at the 92Y in Manhattan to discuss insights from the book, including how to support grieving children, dating after loss, and the “three P’s” that can hinder recovery.

 

Brian and I went to Ina Garten’s home on Easter morning for a lesson on slow-cooked scrambled eggs (with truffles!) and a wide-ranging conversation at her kitchen table. Between bites of breakfast, we discussed Ina’s views on feminism, other celebrity chefs, and her unlikely path from White House nuclear energy expert to Food Network star. Plus, an unexpected cameo from Jeffrey, Ina’s husband of 48 years.