As the longest-serving black woman in the House of Representatives, Congresswoman Maxine Waters has been a fixture of California’s political scene since the 1970s. In 2017, she unexpectedly became a viral sensation, too. We meet up with Rep. Waters in Los Angeles to talk about “reclaiming her time,” growing up as one of 13 children, and why she doesn’t hesitate to call President Trump racist. Plus, the Congresswoman offers a poetry reading.

Questions about Donald Trump? Maggie Haberman has answers. She began reporting on Trump as a New York tabloid journalist over a decade ago. Now, as a White House correspondent for the New York Times, she’s made a name for herself by filing scoop after scoop about his presidency. She joins us to parse everything from Trump’s Diet Coke consumption to his cabinet relationships. We also discuss the role— and limits— of journalism in holding the president accountable. “lt is not a reporter’s job to hold an impeachment trial,” Maggie says. Plus, this episode kicks off our new series: Wonder Women!

Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski share a morning TV news show— and a life. For over a decade, they’ve co-hosted Morning Joe on MSNBC, along with Willie Geist. Soon they’ll take on new titles: husband and wife. Brian and I went to NBC Studios in New York to talk with Mika and Joe about the criticism they’ve faced for their coverage of Donald Trump, the evolution of the GOP, and why they think the 25th Amendment should be invoked. Plus, their account of New Year’s at Mar-a-Lago.

Maria Sharapova has won five Grand Slams since becoming a pro tennis player at just 14 years old— and she’s faced her share of setbacks, too. Sharapova joins me at the 92Y in New York City to discuss highlights from her new memoir, including emigrating from Russia at age 6, her rivalry with Serena Williams, and the urine test that took her off the court. Sharapova also opens up about her recent ban from tennis, calling it “one of the toughest things that an athlete can go through.” Plus, what it was like to return.

Danny Meyer is a legend in the food business. While he’s best known for founding Shake Shack, the global burger empire, he actually got his start in fine dining. He was just 27 years old when he opened his first restaurant, the Union Square Cafe. I headed over there to talk with Danny (over tagliatelle) about the decision to eliminate tipping at many of his restaurants, the difference between service and hospitality, and why he was initially embarrassed to tell his family he wanted to go into the restaurant business. Plus, he shares his recommended order at Shake Shack.

Marie Kondo brings her world-renowned tidying expertise to my own closet, where—let’s just say—not everything is “sparking joy.” We discuss Marie’s early (and sometimes overzealous) forays into organizing and why the “KonMari Method” for cleaning up has turned into a global phenomenon. Plus, Marie explains how her young daughters have changed her approach to tidying and divulges the unnecessary object in her home that she refuses to give away.

As the chief official White House photographer for President Obama, Pete Souza spent eight years in the “room where it happens.” He has the stories — and the pictures— to show for it: from playing cards with POTUS on Air Force One to photographing the Situation Room during the raid that killed Osama bin Laden. No one, with the possible exception of the First Lady, spent more time with Barack Obama during his presidency. Plus, Pete reflects on his formative years outside Washington, including a harrowing, snowy trek on horseback to document the fall of Kabul, Afghanistan.